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Tag Archives: one pot dish

Chicken, Leek and Asparagus Oven Risotto


Here’s another recipe that’s super easy, pretty fast and will cheer you up if you’re staying at home in social isolation.

It’s quick and easy because it’s an oven baked risotto! The recipe is based on a Bill Granger recipe. Our own home grown cook and restaurateur has recipes for a couple of oven baked risottos.It makes sense to let the oven do the cooking rather than spend all that time stirring on the stove top!

You could replace the leeks or asparagus with whatever you fancy – zucchini, peas, broad beans or even tomatoes for a red hued risotto…

And have a glass or two of the riesling that you opened to put in the risotto!

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
500g chicken breast or thighs, cut into thin strips
1 onion, finely chopped
1 leek, sliced into rounds
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
250g Arborio rice
500ml chicken stock
250ml white wine + extra if needed
1 bunch of asparagus, sliced on the diagonal
A handful of grated parmesan or pecorino cheese, plus extra to serve
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Method

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large casserole dish on the stove top over a high heat. Add the chicken pieces and cook, stirring frequently for 3-4 minutes or until golden brown. Remove and set aside.

Add the remaining olive to the pan, then the onion and leek, and cook, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes or until the onion and leek are soft. Add the lemon zest and cook, stirring for 30 seconds. Add the Arborio rice and stir to coat the grains in the oil. Add the chicken stock and white wine, and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally.

Cover the casserole and put in the oven for 20 minutes. At this point, if the risotto seems to have absorbed all the liquid, add a splash or two of white wine. Add asparagus, return the chicken to the casserole and bake for a few minutes or until the asparagus is just tender, the liquid is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Bill says to do this for 3-4 minutes, I found it took more like 10 minutes to fully cook the rice.

Stir in parmesan or pecorino and season with salt and pepper. Serve with extra cheese.

Beef Casserole: Isolationist Cooking in the Covid 19 Era

We are living in strange times, in the era of Covid 19. Like a lot of people, I am spending time at home, socially isolating to avoid unnecessary contact with people. I am shopping carefully, stocking up on staples, without going overboard, and thinking about what dishes I can cook with what’s in the freezer and pantry, and don’t require last minute shopping.

I will post a few of these recipes over the next few weeks. To start with, here’s a recipe for a beautiful beef and red wine casserole. I recommend buying some good slow cooking beef cuts and freezing for just this kind of recipe. The other ingredients that are not pantry staples are carrots and onions, and thankfully these can be acquired and then will last quite a long time, ie you can buy and keep on hand for a couple of weeks until you need them.

I began to write this recipe at the end of a Sydney summer, but it soon became apparent it would be a great start to my “isolationist cooking”.

It’s late March 2020 in Sydney. Just a month ago we were sweltering in a hot, hot bushfire summer with humid days and even stickier nights, when the temperature overnight barely dropped a degree or two, making sleeping and living difficult.

But the rain came and the cooler weather with it. Autumn is definitely in the air. While we will have plenty of warm days to come, there is enough cool weather to make me feel like starting some autumn cooking: cakes and tarts with autumn fruits, and nourishing, robust casseroles, rich with root vegetables and red wine.

This is a simple beef casserole recipe that I developed from the memory of many family meals and my own efforts at throwing a few things in a pot and coming up with something tasty!

Beef + onions + carrots + red wine + herbs = a pot of deliciousness.

Here’s the basic recipe. For the beef, any cheap cut of beef is great. My preference is for shin (gravy) beef, but that cut is hard to get in Australia. Chuck steak is good, as well as blade beef.


Ingredients

1 tablespoon plain flour
Sea salt and ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
500g casserole beef cut into small pieces
4 shallots or 1 large onion, chopped
4 -6 baby or small carrots, cut into chunks or keep whole if small enough
1 tin whole peeled tomatoes
1 glass red wine
1 teaspoon vegemite or marmite dissolved in 1/2 cup boiling water
Bouquet garnis – bay leaf, a few sprigs of thyme and rosemary, tied together
A pinch of sugar to season

Method
Pre-heat oven to 140 degrees C.

Dust the beef pieces in the flour and salt and pepper by placing them in a zip lock bag and shake. Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed casserole on the stove top.

Fry the beef in small quantities to avoid “stewing” the meat, until brown on all sides. Remove the beef to a plate, add a little more oil to the pan if necessary, and fry the shallots and carrots.

Return the meat to the casserole. Add the tomatoes, roughly chopping as you mix in to the casserole. Add the red wine and vegemite/marmite and water and the pinch of sugar.

Cook on a medium heat with lid off for 5 minutes, then transfer the casserole, with lid on, to the pre-heated oven. Cook for about 3 hours or until beef is very tender. I check after 2 hours and test the ”doneness” of the beef. It is usually a little chewy and needs further cooking. If the beef is cooked to your liking, by all means serve now.

If there is lot of liquid in the stew, now is the time to leave the lid off and return to the oven.

Remove from the oven when finally cooked, and serve. Or the casserole can be refrigerated or frozen until you are ready to use.

I like to serve the beef casserole with rice or couscous or some potatoes baked in their jackets.

A really tasty recipe that not only is easy to make from the pantry and freezer but it’s a lovely way to spend time in these isolationist times.

Ham and Curried Egg Noodles: Jamie Oliver 5 Ingredients

I found this recipe very timely! I wanted to find a different way to turn the Christmas ham into a new and exciting dish. There are only just so many ham sandwiches or ham salads you can eat in the New Year…

So, Jamie Oliver’s 5 Ingredients, a source of a lot of easily prepared and tasty recipes, was consulted. This ham recipe could have been designed for the festive season. It’s pretty simple, and takes only a few minutes to rustle up.

The curry powder and egg do tend to bind together so it looks a bit scrambled! Just scatter a few more spring onions on top if you want to tidy up the dish.

Here is Jamie’s recipe as is. The olive oil is not memtioned in the ingredients list as it is one of the “staple ingredients” of the 5 Ingredients system of cooking.

Ingredients
l50g egg noodles
4 spring onions
l00g roast ham
2 teaspoons curry powder
2 large eggs

Method
Cook the noodles in a pan of boiling salted water according to the packet instructions, then drain, reserving a mugful of cooking water. Meanwhile, trim and finely slice the spring onions, and finely slice the ham.

Place the ham in a non-stick frying pan on a medium-high heat with one tablespoon of olive oil and the curry powder. While it gets nicely golden, beat the eggs. Pour them into the pan, moving them around with a rubber spatula until they start to cook, then stir in the noodles and most of the spring onions.

Toss over the heat for 2 minutes, then taste and season to perfection with sea salt and black pepper; loosening with a splash of reserved noodle water if needed.

Dish up the noodles, scatter over the remaining spring onions and finish with  one teaspoon of extra virgin olive oil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hunter Chicken or Chicken Chasseur

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32DE12DD-1A2B-4BFB-AEDE-149E7A6EC50DAn old favourite from the 70s, this is a really simple dish based on the French classic. I prefer to call it Hunter Chicken – it sounds earthier and more rustic than the French original!

My version is loosely based on a James Martin recipe for Chicken Chasseur.

Ingredients

2 chicken breasts and 2 chicken thighs, skin on (or any combination of chicken pieces to make up the equivalent of 1/2 chicken)
Salt and ground black pepper
25g plain flour
1 tbsp olive oil
50g butter
50g bacon rashers, chopped into pieces
100g button mushrooms
3-4 shallots, thickly sliced
1 tsp caster sugar
100 mls white wine
200 mls chicken stock
2 tbsp tomato paste
1 tsp thyme leaves, finely chopped
1/2 tsp rosemary, finely chopped
1 tbsp flat leaf parsley, finely chopped

Method

Place the chicken in a large ziplock bag and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper then add the flour and toss to coat.

Heat a large frying pan until hot, add the oil and half the butter then fry the chicken pieces, skin side down, for 1-2 minutes until golden-brown. Turn the chicken and fry on the other side for another 1-2 minutes.

Heat another frying pan until hot, add the remaining butter and fry the bacon and button mushrooms until they are brown. Add the shallots and then the caster sugar and fry for 2-3 minutes until brown and caramelised.

Pour the wine into the frying pan, stirring to deglaze, making sure you scrape all the goodness from the bottom of the pan.

Spoon or carefully pour the bacon and mushroom mixture over the chicken in the other frying pan. Add the stock and tomato paste to the chicken and bring to the boil.

Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30-40 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through and the liquid slightly reduced.

When the chicken is cooked, scatter the dish with the thyme, rosemary and flat leaf parsley and serve.

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Jamie’s Baked Garlicky Mushrooms: 5 Ingredients

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203BFF35-0EE7-4D7E-8119-C9070EE54BE9Love veggies? Love mushrooms? Here’s Jamie’s super simple mushroom bake, good as a starter, or as a substantial lunch or supper “snack”. The recipe comes from 5 Ingredients, Jamie Oliver’s great book. I’m gradually working my way through it!

It takes minimum time to prepare and to cook. I made the dish last weekend, in between some cake and brownie baking. I had the first half warm on sourdough toast and the other half the next night just as it was. Delish!

Ingredients

4 cloves of garlic

 ½ a bunch of fresh sage (15g)

350g ripe mixed-colour cherry tomatoes

4 large portobello mushrooms

40g Cheddar cheese

Method

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C. Peel and very finely slice the garlic. Pick the sage leaves. Halve the cherry tomatoes. Peel the mushrooms, reserving the peel.

Place it all (peel included) in a 25cm x 30cm roasting tray and drizzle with 1 tablespoon each of olive oil and red wine vinegar. Add a pinch of sea salt and black pepper and toss together. Pick out 12 perfect garlic slices and sage leaves for later and sit the mushrooms stalk side up on the top. Bake for IO minutes.

Remove the tray from the oven, crumble the cheese into the mushroom cups and sprinkleover the reserved garlic and sage*. Return to the oven for I5 more minutes or until the cheese is melted and everything’s golden then serve up.

*I added some rosemary sprigs too, as rosemary works well with sage.  

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John’s Chermoula Chicken

 

 

Another glorious autumn day in March, the warm and languid days more like an Indian summer. I was  at Palm Beach, visiting the Architect to celebrate the birthday of the Delegator. I am always in for a treat on a Palm Beach visit – not only a lovely view but always scrumptious food.

Thr Architect had made his famous orange and almond cake, always delicious, but the real surprise was that the Delegator himself had made a beautiful chicken dish based on that wonderful spice concoction, chermoula paste. It was unctuous and fragrant, and accompanied by couscous, grilled asparagus, vine ripened tomatoes and a little aoli, made a lovely lunch dish.

The Delegator used Christine Manfield’s Chermoula Paste  available from specialty grocers such as Simon Johnson in Australia. It’s not that difficult to make your own, if you can’t access this paste or similar.

Here is my rough approximation of the recipe as told to me by the Delegator.

Ingredients

12 chicken thighs fillets, skin on or off, depending on your personal preference

1 tbls of Chris Mansfield  Chermoula Paste or see here for a link to a Neil Perry recipe

1 tbls extra virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 lemon

3 lemon halves

A few sprigs of lemon thyme

Sea salt and ground black pepper to season

A dozen slices of prosciutto

Method

Marinate the chicken thigh fillets in a large bowl with the Chermoula Paste, olive oil and the juice of the lemon. Leave for a few hours or preferably overnight.

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C.

Remove the chicken mixture and place in an ovenproof baking dish. Add the 3 cut lemon halves and lemon thyme to the mixture, and  season with salt and pepper. Finish by layering the prosciutto slices on the top. Bake in the preheated oven for about 30 minutes until the chicken is cooked through.

The chicken will give up a lot of juice, along with the lemons, so it’s great to serve this chicken dish with couscous or rice, or even crusty bread.

Well done to the Delegator for his inventive and delicious dish!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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