RSS Feed

Tag Archives: liqueur

Very Blueberry Cake with Toasted Hazelnuts

IMG_6830

I’m very keen on blueberries at the moment and they are relatively inexpensive at the markets. This cake does blueberries 4 ways! Dried blueberries and fresh blueberries in the batter, blueberry “jam” on top of the cooked cake and more fresh blueberries as a garnish. The cake has quite a nutty taste from the hazelnut meal and the toasted hazelnuts.

It’s a very moist cake too, and is great for dessert.

Ingredients

125 g softened butter

115 g  caster sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

2 free-range eggs

1 heaped tbls our cream

3/4 cup hazelnut meal

1/4 cup toasted and finely chopped  hazelnuts

3/4 cups self-raising flour

1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

1/4 cup milk

30 g dried blueberries, soaked in 1 tblsp of orange liqueur  for a hour or so  (any liqueur will do)

200 g fresh blueberries

1/3 cup caster sugar

Method

Preheat oven to 170 degrees C or 160 degrees C fan-forced. Grease a 20cm spring form tin and line base with baking paper.

Cream butter, caster sugar and vanilla extract in a food processor.  Add the eggs and process until the mixture is thick and creamy. Beat in the sour cream.  Sift the hazelnut meal with the chopped hazelnuts,  SR flour and bicarbonate of soda. Stir the sifted ingredients into the mixture with a spoon, then stir in the milk.

Gently fold in the soaked dried blueberries and half of the fresh blueberries.  Spoon into the cake tin using a spatula.

Bake for 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean.

Meanwhile, cook the remaining blueberries and caster sugar with 2 tablespoons of water in a small saucepan for a few minutes until the sugar is dissolved, the blueberries are slightly softened and the liquid slightly reduced. You can gently press on the blueberries with the back of spoon or the bottom of a cup to help them release their juices.

Cool the cake completely in the tin before unmolding. Pile the blueberry “jam” onto the top of the cake.

Serve with more fresh berries and a sprinkling of sugar if desired, and serve with creme fraiche or sour cream, which offsets the incredible sweetness of this cake.

IMG_6816IMG_6858

Christmas Day Trifle

IMG_6570

This is my traditional dessert for a cold Christmas lunch on what is usually a hot Australian Christmas day. The day, this year, 2013, was a little cooler than usual, but the trifle was well received as a “lighter” offering after our numerous savoury courses.

The photos are of the large trifle and a smaller one I also made.

This is a rough method for the making of the trifle rather than a recipe!

My version of trifle consists of butter cake, broken into chunks, which line a glass bowl. The cake is then soaked in Grand Marnier  – any sweet liqueur would work well.

Layer some raspberry jelly over the cake, followed by “real” custard, a good recipe from Jamie Oliver for which is written below.

Leave to chill in the fridge for a few hours. Spoon whipped cream over the trifle, and top with fresh strawberries or other berries.

Leave in the fridge for several hours, up to a day, for the flavours to meld.

IMG_6576

Custard
Adapted from “Cook with Jamie: My Guide to Making You a Better Cook” by Jamie Oliver

Ingredients
500 ml whole milk
500 m heavy cream
6 tbls sugar
1 vanilla bean, scored lengthways
8 large free range egg yolks

Method
Mix cream, milk, and four tablespoons of sugar in a saucepan over medium low heat.
Scrape out all the seeds in the vanilla bean into the saucepan, including the bean.
Stir with a wooden spoon until it boils and then turn off the heat.
Let it sit for a few minutes to let the vanilla infuse with the cream and milk mixture.
In a separate bowl, whisk the yolks with 2 tablespoons of sugar until pale yellow in colour.
Remove the bean from the saucepan and slowly add one ladle of the cream mixture to the  yolks while whisking them together.
Keep whisking and slowly add a couple more ladles.
Pour the yolk mixture back into the saucepan with cream and milk and stir with a wooden spoon under medium heat.
As the eggs cook, the custard will thicken in several minutes. It is thick enough if it coats the back of the wooden spoon.
Chill the custard before pouring over the jelly and cake.

IMG_6629

%d bloggers like this: